10 Fun Facts About the History of Ice Cream

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Ice Cream

Legends hint at ancient Greeks enjoying ice cream in 5th century B.C. Marco Polo possibly shared an early version in 1300s Italy.

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It Was Brought to America in the 1700s

Ice cream, a European delicacy from the 1300s, reached America in the 1700s. The first U.S. ice cream parlor emerged in 1776, marking the sweet start of a trend.

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New Zealand Eats the Most Ice Cream

New Zealand tops global ice cream love at 28.4 liters/year, followed by the U.S. at 20.8 liters/year and Australia with 18 liters/year.

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Ice Cream May Have Some Benefits

Surprising twist: Daily half-cup of ice cream linked to lower heart risk in diabetics, per 2023 research. A sweet scoop of health?

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Ice Cream Sundaes Have a Fun History

Indulge in the magic of ice cream history: sundaes emerged as a Sunday treat during an Evanston soda ban. Dive into delicious nostalgia!

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Vanilla's Massive Popularity

Vanilla rules! Tops in polls worldwide—USA, Italy, Germany, NZ, Brazil, China. Choc trails, then cookies & cream. Classics win hearts!

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Neapolitan & Birthday Cake are Unpopular Flavors

Neapolitan and Birthday Cake ice cream, chosen by only 2% of Americans, share the spot as least favorite. Opt for classic vanilla or chocolate instead!

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Ice Cream Cones Were Created Around 1904

In 1896, Italo Marchiony claimed the 1st ice cream cone, while in 1904, at St. Louis World's Fair, Ernest Hamwi improvised with waffle-like cones.

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Ice Cream Was Once a Rare Treat

Once a luxury for the elite, ice cream became accessible in 1800 with ice houses. Prepackaged treats and delivery vehicles fueled its sweet revolution.

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Melted Ice Cream Changes in Texture a Bit

Melted ice cream loses its fluffy texture; refreezing changes it. Air bubbles break down, leaving it less soft. Keep it creamy, avoid refreezing!

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